22-25th VAUTHA FAIR (MELA)_GUJARAT

Legends of Vautha Fair
Legends of Vautha Fair describes the beauty of the historical stories and the stories dedicated to the Hindu Gods and Goddesses.

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Vautha Fair

Vautha no melo and the legends behold the traditions.

This fair is held every year at Vautha, where two rivers, the Sabarmati and the Vatrak meet. Vautha fair site is also known as Saptasangam as it is at the confluence of seven rivers. Legends specify that Lord Kartik or Kartikeya, the son of Lord Shiva and Parvati, visited the site. Kartik, popularly known as Muruga, is the commander of the army of the Devas. The fair is dedicated to Kartikeya and is held during Kartika Purnima, the full moon night of the Gujarati month of Kartik (October – November). The most important Shiva temple here is the temple of Siddhanath.

What is most significant about this fair is that it is the only major animal trading fair in Gujarat and is on par with the famous camel fair at Pushkar, Rajasthan. However the only animals traded here are donkeys. About 4,000 donkeys are brought every year for sale, usually by Vanjara (gypsy) traders. Donkeys are painted in different colors and decorated and this is a major highlight of the fair.

Vautha Mela attracts more than 500,000 people. The pilgrims who visit Vautha during the fair are from several communities and include farmers, labourers and people belonging to several castes.

Bhavnath Mahadev Fair Vautha Fair
Chitra-Vichitra Fair Modhera Dance Festival
Dangs Durbar Fair Kutchh Utsav
Dhrang Fair Ambaji Purnima Fair
Tarnetar Fair (Trinetrashwar Mahadev Fair)
Shamlaji Fair

 Legends of Vautha FairLegends of Vautha Fair define the mythological history related to Lord Kartik or Kartikeya. Vautha Mela or Fair is held every year at Vautha, where two rivers, the Sabarmati River and the Vatrak meet.

Site of Vathua Fair
The site of Vautha fair site is also known as Saptasangam as it is at the confluence of seven rivers. The history of Vatha Fair specifies that Lord Kartikeya is the son of Lord Shiva or Mahadeva andParvati who visited the site. Kartik, popularly known as Muruga, is the commander of the army of the Devas.

Dedication to Vathua Fair
Vathua Fair is dedicated to Kartikeya and is held during Kartika Purnima, the full moon night of the Gujarati month of Kartik (October – November). The most important Shiva temple here is the temple of Siddhanath.

Significance of Vathua Fair
The most significant thing about this fair is that it is the only major animal trading fair in Gujarat and is on par with the famous camel fair at Pushkar, Rajasthan. However the only animals traded here are donkeys. About 4,000 donkeys are brought every year for sale, usually by Vanjara (gypsy) traders. The donkeys are painted in different colours and decorated and this is a major highlight of the fair.

Attraction of Vathua Fair
Vautha Mela or Vathua Fair attracts more than 500,000 people. The pilgrims who visit Vautha during the fair are from several communities and include farmers, labourers and people belonging to several castes.

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